Stich stich stich

For the longest time I have admired the jacket in this painting (without knowing who painted it, or when it’s from) Silk embroidery is a wonderful art form but buying an antique would be far out of my price range, instead I am giving myself a winter project, to make myself a embroidered jacket, loose fitting out of midnight blue silk and hand embroidered by me. Long hours of sitting inside and embroidering are better suited to cold winter months than these lovely long summer days. So for the rest of this sunny season I shall be designing and buying fabric, in preparation for a winter full of stitches. Below are some examples of embroidery that I will be taking inspiration from when it comes to my own designs…

Cape ca. 1925 via The Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Cape ca. 1925 via The Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Callot Soeurs dress ca. 1925 via The Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Callot Soeurs dress ca. 1925 via The Costume Institute of the Metropolitan
Museum of Art

Boué Soeurs court dress ca. 1928 via The Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Boué Soeurs court dress ca. 1928 via The Costume Institute of the Metropolitan
Museum of Art

Late 19th century rbe via The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Late 19th century rbe via The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Coat via The Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art
Vest ca. 1840 via The Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art Court coat ca. 1775-1789 via The Costume Institute of The Metropolitan Museum of ArtCourt mantua ca. 1740-1745 via The Victoria & Albert Museum
“Object Type ‘Court dress’ was an exclusive and very ornate style of clothing worn by the aristocracy, the only people usually invited to attend at Court. The style of the robe is quite old-fashioned, and based on the 17th-century mantua.
Designs & Designing The shell, the quintessential Rococo motif, constitutes the basis of the embroidery pattern. Leafy scrolls, latticed arcades and tassels are also featured, as well a profusion of realistically rendered flowers, including jasmine, morning glory and honeysuckle, peonies, roses, poppies, anemones, auriculas, hyacinths, carnations, cornflowers, tulips and daffodils. The pattern of the silver shells and scrolls has been arranged symmetrically at the hem, but the layout of the flowers, while balanced, does not match exactly on either side. This ensemble recalls a garment worn by the Duchess of Queensbury in 1740: ‘her cloathes were embroidered upon white satin; Vine leaves, Convulvus and Rosebuds shaded after Nature …’.
Materials & Making Seven panels of ivory-ribbed silk make up the petticoat. The robings, sleeve cuffs and skirt of the mantua are embroidered in the same design, but were modified to fit their exact proportions.
The flowers are worked in a variety of coloured silks in satin stitch and french knots. Silver thread delineates the leaves and the non-floral components of the pattern. Some of the scrolls and border elements have a backing of parchment, for solidity and regularity of line. The tassels and bases of the shells have been thickly padded underneath. Varying the height of the padding under the embroidery of the silver leaves gives the surface of the stitching a rippled effect.”

All images from the marvelous OMG that dress tumblr: http://omgthatdress.tumblr.com/ a fantastic resource for images of (mainly) western costume from early examples to recent vintage.

 

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